KNX-Lighting Control Part 2

Lighting and KNX control.

In a previous blog I discussed the advantage of using KNX for the lighting control only.  Some of the KNX control options are expensive so in order to keep things simple and affordable I have decided to use the following devices to control the lighting.  As most of the LED lights are using around 5 Watts of power I will also eliminate the dimming functions and ensure that the layout of the lights in the ceiling can be switched on separate circuits in the larger rooms (a simple form of dimming in a way).

Universal Interface

The hardware required will be a KNX binary input /output device  with 12 inputs/outputs to connect to standard light switches. The advantage is that the cost is reduced by not using a special KNX light switch.  A single KNX switch can cost up to €100 while a simple mechanical switch that costs €2 or €4 approximately can carry out most of the primary switching functions and is designed to work on the KNX system.

My preference and research on the best value for money is a product made by ABB called an Universal Interface US/U 12.2 . Expect to pay around €120 for one of these  which has 12 inputs/outputs (Equates to €12 euro per room). It can also carry out dimming control with a suitable KNX actuator (device that switches the power from a central distribution location). There are numerous other functions built in that are relevant to lighting and indication control.

Universal Interface
EIN KNX Interface

The plan is to mount one of these Universal Interfaces in 4 different areas in the house (The size of one of these units is approximately 52mm in diameter) .  A maximum of 12 light switches will connect to this Universal Interface. It is recommended to keep the cable feeding the light switches to a maximum length of 10 meters (although I have found it works reliably up to 100 meters). I will be using screened alarm cable (6 core) to each of the switches. In this way I plan to leave a spare core for each switch so that other functions can be applied in the future without re-decorating.  I will be using a push to make light switch as this allows one to use the same pair of cables for two way control and optimise the use of the cores in the cable.

Each 12 channel Universal Interface will have its own  KNX 12 channel switch actuator ( see below-it can control 12 different lights using 230 volt power in the building) that will switch the LED lights. One location to source these is http://www.eibmarkt.com

Switch Actuator

For the switch actuator (relay control of the lights) one can select the equivalent 12 channel KNX actuator. If one goes to the above web site or other KNX web sites and enters EIB KNX switch actuator 12-fold, SA.12.16  in the search engine one will find these units. Expect to pay around €230 for one. If one goes to http://www.eibmarket.com they have one for around €239 including VAT.  This works out at a cost of around €20 per room along with the savings in wiring and flexibility in the future as discussed in the previous blog.

actuator

Dimming Option

If one wants to dim LED lights one needs to research a suitable dimmer for the LED light. There  are different technologies used to dim LED lights so one needs to establish which LED lights to use first before committing to purchasing a dimming function. I am aware of two types such as leading edge and trailing edge controls for dimming.  As I will not be dimming the low wattage lights a simple actuator is all that is required.

3 thoughts on “KNX-Lighting Control Part 2”

  1. Hi Seamus – looking to buy a few different temperature Sharp LEDsto test but can’t find the same heatsink / mounting / reflector etc you used, your web skills surpass mine! Can you share any links? I found the recom unit but not sure what wire gauge and other parts I need to mount the Zenigatas to set up a test rig?
    Thanks!

    1. Hi Michael,
      I will get the details for you tomorrow and send them on. By the way did you research if the sharp zenigata leds are available to the domestic market now as it was two years ago when I did the research on these and at that time one could purchase a complete bulb with the sharp led which was available to the commercial sector. They were expensive 2 years ago.

      There is a company I came across recently called http://www.ledengin.com/products/gallerywhite who cater for the commercial sector using a different high colour rendering LED’s and they have distributors in Europe on their web site. I would be interested to find out what these cost.

      For the high colour rendering leds the whiter the led light the better the colour rendering it seems. So one may need to balance what look one is looking for – example a living room may look better with the warm high CRI leds while a kitchen may look better with a whiter look and the highest cri (colour rendering index).

      Regards,
      Seamus

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